Transcript 50: Making Social Media Fun and Engaging, with Hannah Kerr


Intro:

You’re listening to Undeclared, the podcast that provides strategies to overcome the challenges that higher education institutions face. We help colleges and universities attract the right students because we know an educated planet is a better place for everyone. Please welcome your host, Scott Fogleman and Allison Lanier.

Allison Lanier:

Hi, I’m Alison.

Scott Fogleman:

And I’m Scott, and you are listening to Undeclared, a podcast for higher education problem solvers, where we discuss all things higher ed with university and college professionals, as well as industry experts.

Allison Lanier:

Social media strategies have become top of mind for most institutions. We all know that developing these strategies can be super overwhelming, which platforms should we be on? How do we know what content to post? How often should we be posting? Not to mention the importance of understanding your audience and how to reach them.

Scott Fogleman:

Yeah, so overwhelming is a nice euphemism for many of what we’re thinking. It takes a lot of time planning, attention to detail, follow through, metrics, reporting it goes on and on and on. So basically it can often be a full-time job, but not many of us have the luxury. I’m going to say the luxury of having a full-time staff member who can manage our social and really make sure that this is a top of mind awareness across their day.

Scott Fogleman:

So what we’re most excited to talk to you about today is that we have a guest who is joining us as a recent college grad, fairly recent college grad, who’s going to be able to share some exciting tips and tricks on how to make this task a little less daunting, a little bit more manageable, and one that can be fun. Let’s not make it a burden. Let’s make it fun and an enjoyable experience.

Allison Lanier:

We are so excited to introduce you to our guest, Hannah Kerr. Hannah started her career three years ago when she created her first blog. She created her blog while in college as a platform to help her heal from an eating disorder and utilize her faith to figure out her next steps. Hannah also uncovered her passions for creating positive content through photographs and writing to help those that may be inspired by her personal experience. One of her goals is to inspire and provide insight to those looking for an authentic way to be on social media and grow their business. She does just that through her workshops, mentoring and photography. Hannah’s workshops include the how-tos of social media and blogging on the go.

Allison Lanier:

Scott and I most recently met Hannah because we took one of her workshops and absolutely loved it. We took her social media workshop on Instagram. She really absolutely knows her stuff. And we are just so excited to talk to her today and kind of get her perspective of being an influencer, how she started her career while on campus and just how all of that can really help benefit you guys. So, Hannah, thanks for joining us today. And I’m just going to pass it over to you to introduce yourself to our audience.

Hannah Kerr:

Thank you guys for having me. So that intro is spot on. I am a kind of recent grad. I graduated from Western Kentucky University in 2018. So almost yeah, over two years ago, which is just crazy.

Scott Fogleman:

It is crazy, right? It goes by fast.

Hannah Kerr:

I know, it’s stressing me out. But I was a public relations major and my minor was meeting and exposition planning. So I went into college not knowing what I wanted to do, like probably every college graduate who’s not doing a specific major like nursing or premed, things like that. So public relations, I honestly did it because my older sister did it and she seems to be doing great, so [inaudible 00:03:47]. So I went to a college and really did not know anybody. So I loved that. It was like a clean slate for me.

Hannah Kerr:

I definitely was going through a harder journey personally. And when you’re in a new city and you don’t know anybody and social media is kind of growing, you’re like I can really do whatever I want with it. So I did my sophomore year. I opened the blog because I kind of heard about it in one of my PR classes, and this was when blogging and social media influencing on Instagram was like on the rise, but kind of unclear. So randomly started a WordPress account that was horrendous. It was so bad.

Scott Fogleman:

Yay, step one.

Hannah Kerr:

Oh, step one. Oh yeah. It was really, really rough. But I just pretty much was writing in a journal every day, starting my freshman year to my sophomore year and decided to just publish some of my journal entries just to see what would happen to it.

Allison Lanier:

That’s bold, girl. I love it.

Hannah Kerr:

Yeah, it was something, but it’s really put me to where I am today, which I know we’ll dive into more, but that’s kind of how I started and where it all happened.

Allison Lanier:

Awesome.

Scott Fogleman:

Oh, that’s great. So we’re definitely excited to talk with you further and share some of the knowledge that you shared with Allison and I most recently in that skill pop class. We actually really enjoyed it and were able to bring back some of that knowledge to our team and to our listeners as well. But before we get started, we do want to have some time for just asking you, what inspires you most during your day and what makes you most passionate about your work with communications as a whole?

Hannah Kerr:

I love this story. I mean, that question, I’m thinking of storytelling because that’s really what pumps me up. I think you get the chance on social media to positively affect one person a day. And when I first started this, I was like, okay, if I can positively make someone smile, inspire them to go for something that they are too nervous because they’re comparing themselves to their neighbor or anything, just that one step of encouragement a day, that’s 365 people a year.

Hannah Kerr:

And that just blows my mind because I’m already two years out of college, multiply 365, it’s really mind blowing. So I wake up every day and I’m just pumped to share something new, something different, something true. I don’t know. And that could be a photo of a coffee cup because I drink coffee every single day or it could be my latest adventure. I think that’s what fires me up.

Scott Fogleman:

I love the perspective that you take, and the way that you’re not taking on the world at the time. It’s one individual and the way you’re looking at it is if I can make an impact on one individual level, the student level or whomever it may be, it just takes one a day and 365 days later, look at that impact. And then that one student can then do the same. So that’s one of the things we talk about from Up&Up a lot of times too, is our impact metric. It takes one student to change the dynamic of a family, a community, a culture. And so that’s what we can really do. And the way that you’ve been able to describe that through social and just communications is exactly how we need to be thinking.

Allison Lanier:

Yep. So you gave us a little bit of insight, but clearly your hobby, it started as a hobby, right? Blogging?

Hannah Kerr:

It did.

Allison Lanier:

And now 100% spiraled into a full blown career for you. So can you kind of give us a little bit more background on just kind of how you’ve seen the growth and some things that kind of helped move you forward?

Hannah Kerr:

Absolutely. So in college, your full-time job is you’re a student and this definitely was a hobby of mine. I loved it. I loved writing. I started to get maybe a few responses from my blog posts and that’s very encouraging. Just like anyone, if someone tells you, “You look beautiful today.” You’re like, “Oh, thanks.” It just fires you up. So I noticed that trending, like people were like, “I really want to read more of your blog post.” I’m like, “Oh great.” So I just kept doing it.

Hannah Kerr:

I think the tipping point for me was a, I love photography and getting to link the two, it’s just like a double whammy. It’s a great way to grow. But also the community I was in, I was in a small college town and I probably reached out to so many vendors just being like, “Hey, this is what I’m doing that’s a little different. I would love to come into your store, maybe take a photograph, share it on my blog. If one person reads it, great.” But I think those added up over time. I mean, I dabbled in like the oil, like essential oils. I worked for a juice store. I featured coffee shops and then clothes, but I always brought it back to I’m not a fashion blogger. I just want to share life.

Hannah Kerr:

I think kind of having that more generic role, it opened up more opportunities for me. So I think for a college student, it doesn’t matter what city you’re in. You could be in Atlanta, you could be in small town Bowling Green, Kentucky, if you just connect with your local neighborhood and apply your hobby and what you’re doing, it will grow into something. For me, it grew into a business now, which is unbelievable, but I’ve seen so many other people that were on my journey too open up boutiques and open up a lot of different businesses. It really just started with getting to know your own neighborhood. And I do that in Greenville too.

Scott Fogleman:

Yeah, well, gosh, I think the lesson there for a lot of our listeners can be your campus is part of a greater community as well. Invest in your community, use your social as a way to engage and let them know what you’re doing because you’re supporting each other.

Allison Lanier:

Yeah. So how did you kind of first dabble or get your feet wet in the social media realm? So I know personally that you are more connected on Instagram than most of the other platforms. So if you just want to maybe like dive into like why Instagram and kind of your journey there.

Scott Fogleman:

Yeah.

Hannah Kerr:

So Instagram, I remember when I opened my blog my sophomore year of college, I was really only using it to post my sorority photos. But I always loved photography. So I always tried to put a lot of effort into my photos. And out of all the social media platforms, Instagram is the one for photographs.

Scott Fogleman:

Right.

Hannah Kerr:

YouTube is video, Twitter’s more writing, and Facebook is kind of a mix of both. But Instagram is like an online, I call it an online resume for businesses because you get to create your own magazine pretty much just by your photographs and the tones and the colors. I put a lot of effort into my Instagram because I enjoyed it. It wasn’t a burden for me. I could spend hours taking photos and putting them on a grid and playing around with it, just making sure it looks good. I just enjoy that. I think that’s why I chose Instagram.

Hannah Kerr:

Instagram was a popular platform for me during college. Being in Greek life, I know a lot of people that always were on Instagram. I felt like if people liked my images and my photographs then they would want to read my writing because I touched on this in my workshop, people’s attention spans are really short and we’re all human. And we don’t want to sit and read a lot. So by just getting someone’s attention with a stylish image or something that just catches your eye, I think that intrigued me. So I really started getting passionate about photography and I worked with a lot of photographers just trying to learn their perspective. I think mixing what I learned from photographers and then what I knew about just personal blogging, the two just fit perfect on Instagram.

Allison Lanier:

Yeah.

Scott Fogleman:

Absolutely. So how have you taken that? And so it sounds like it’s a great tool to represent your brand, but also it’s a great promotional platform. So how can we find the balance between brand and promotion with Instagram in mind specifically?

Hannah Kerr:

That’s a really good question. I feel like promotion in your brand, Instagram is the perfect place for both because a, Instagram allows you to promote yourself. It allows you to tag other businesses. You can’t go on a website and type in someone’s name and it pops up on their screen like, “Oh, hey, someone typed in your name on YouTube.” With Instagram, like this morning, I got a package from KIND Bars and I wanted them to know-

Allison Lanier:

And I got real jealous whenever I saw you unbox it.

Hannah Kerr:

I got more, so I’ll send them your way. I’m rocking the tee shirt. I was able to instantly tell their marketing team, “Hey, received this package. Here’s what I have in like, this is what I’m using them for, posting about.” So a, I was utilizing it for my brand because I eat. That’s with my food allergies, and it’s a lot about what I post about. And my followers are like, “Oh, she’s eating KIND Bars again. Great.” But then I got to promote myself with another business instantly. So I think that’s what’s so awesome. You can literally tag other businesses instantly and that’s promotional material. That’s free and at like a snap of your hand.

Allison Lanier:

Yeah. I think that you have already brought up a couple of really key points and I want to tie it back to kind of a deliverable or a takeaway for our audience. So one thing is that, I don’t know if you guys can hear the excitement in Hannah’s voice, but she loves what she does, right?

Hannah Kerr:

My voice gets high.

Allison Lanier:

She loves what she does. And so unfortunately, we understand that a lot of times in higher ed institutions, that the people that are tasked with social media, it may be someone that has zero interest in it, right? And then you’re like …

Scott Fogleman:

They check a box.

Allison Lanier:

You’re like, oh, I have to own social media. Well, I hate it. You guys, there are so many sources or resources that you have on campus, whether it be your students or whether it be someone who just recently graduated, that actually has a true passion for social media. You cannot just force someone into this role. The other thing that she mentioned is you can get so creative.

Allison Lanier:

So Hannah’s mentioning about unboxing products for companies like KIND Bar, right? What if you somehow do a promotional platform of watching new students unbox their welcome packages or promote that. And then you like amp up the excitement about like, “Hey, I got accepted in,” but it’s real videos and you use the real footage. So there’s so many cool ways that you can do this to help promote yourselves.

Hannah Kerr:

Love that.

Scott Fogleman:

Two other tips that you shared Hannah, that were just great call out were that use the visual aspects of Instagram to grab that attention. Get them to pay attention to what you want to speak about, then drive them to another place. So if you want them to read content, use your strong visual images to get them attack or attack, excuse me, get them attracted and carry them over where you want them to go. So you don’t have to use it to necessarily just, hey, link here.

Scott Fogleman:

Drive them there, get that engagement going. And then also, tag those like-minded companies. Tag the brands that you want to be affiliated with. Tag as many people as you can. Because again, it’s all about creating the conversation, finding different ways to do it as Allison mentioned, and use the conversations that are out there already. So use social media, listening to also see, hey, what are the interested followers also liking so that you can understand, okay, how do I best relate? And how do we position ourselves within their interests?

Hannah Kerr:

Absolutely. I feel like Instagram, you don’t stop at Instagram. I feel like I get burnt out sometimes just being on Instagram, but I know it is such a key way to link yourself to businesses. My goal with Instagram is I want to take it off the screen. I want to establish that relationship and then collaborate off the screen. Whether that’s an in-person photo shoot, whether that’s a workshop, whether that’s collaborating at their store, at their business, because my goal is to help them grow. And that’s what engagement’s all about.

Hannah Kerr:

Engagement is engaging with multiple people and sharing those interests and encouraging. I know I hear a lot of negative things about social media. I think we all do. It’s all over the internet, but I feel like if you use it for good and everyone has that same sharing passion, and this applies to schools, businesses, individuals like every single person, I think that’s when you see growth and that’s when you see brands form, because brands are more about community I feel like nowadays.

Scott Fogleman:

Absolutely.

Allison Lanier:

All right. So, you mentioned that what you majored in is not necessarily what your path has kind of evolved to. So what was that experience like as a student and what are some takeaways that you actually have held onto?

Hannah Kerr:

I absolutely love this because I know I mentioned earlier, I feel like nobody goes into college really knowing what their career is going to be. But my major in public relations, it was very helpful. I will say it was a lot of, in my perspective, like old fashioned marketing to where it wasn’t as up to date with like every person. There’s a reason I teach my workshops, every business, if you’re really not on Instagram or you’re not on social media engaging with your customers, you’re not going to grow as fast as your competitor who’s doing that.

Hannah Kerr:

So I think with PR and my meeting and exposition planning minor, which was pretty much event planning, it really does tie into what I’m doing now. But I’ll say with PR, I decided to take the more modern approach. And I decided to do social media for a local juice bar in town. And with that, I was taking what I was learning, but also combining my passion of media and photography. And I kind of started teaching myself my own things. A lot of my business is trial and error on my part.

Hannah Kerr:

I always encourage that for anyone wanting to do a business. I’m totally self-taught a lot of it, but I feel like with college, it teaches you how to do stuff independently and it challenges you and it teaches you time management. As a college student, you learn so many things just by going to class, like making sure you have everything, being accountable for your work, deadlines, following up with your team members. I follow up with clients daily. I think I still use those things.

Scott Fogleman:

Absolutely.

Hannah Kerr:

So I will say if I were to go back in time, would I probably change my major? Probably just because now I’m not doing that traditional PR and marketing as I was. However, I did learn a lot from just the day to day of being a college student and going to class. And I think that’s really impacted my career now.

Scott Fogleman:

That’s awesome. So one of the things, an opportunity that many of our listeners have is to tap into students on campus, to help support their work, to add an enhancing experience outside of just academics alone. It’s kind of a win for all because they get the support they need from a student worker perspective, but the students also get that experience.

Scott Fogleman:

So what advice could you offer for our listeners who are looking to incorporate students into their day to day, as student workers helping support their social media efforts, how can they better help prepare them for doing that task? But also you’ve talked about how it has really supported you outside of your major. What are the different ways that our listeners could tap into those students and really help create an enhancing experience beyond just the classroom?

Hannah Kerr:

I love that. I absolutely say go for it. If you’re trying to reach students or you are a part of a certain program, a certain college, and you’re wanting to reach your different audiences of students, social media is a great platform to do it. I can’t tell you how many Greek organizations at WKU incorporated social media to grow their organization and to figure out what’s going on on the North side of campus today? People are showing photos, creating hashtags, sharing them on social media. I started to see a lot of clubs utilize social media.

Hannah Kerr:

And so for anybody that is trying to start that, first, encourage the people using social media it is a professional platform. I think I tell people all the time, college students, high school students, it’s really true. The photos you put on mine are like a resume. That’s how my perspective is on social media. It’s like a LinkedIn profile. People will not just look at one photo. They’re going to look at all of your past photos too. So when creating a group of people utilizing one social media feed, make sure everyone’s on the same page, encourage people to apply the knowledge of their group organization on social media, on an individual basis as well. So day to day, how are you presenting yourself online? I think that will help people grow.

Scott Fogleman:

So Hannah, you’ve offered a lot of great advice, but again, a lot of our listeners are going to be asking, okay, well, how can I start? How can I make this an easier process? So in your workshop that Allison and I were able to attend, you gave some really incredible tips and tools. Are you able to offer any of those for our listeners as well on how we can help make scheduling content easier, getting our posts scheduled in advance so that when we have those rare days that we have free time, we can kind of plan ahead. Can you share some of those insights as well?

Hannah Kerr:

Absolutely. I think just starting is all you have to do. I know it sounds so easy, but it’s really not. I get girls that message me so much just saying, how do you do it? And I’m like, I just do it. I just put stuff out there. Not going to lie. I have taken some stuff down because it failed. You’re going to fail in this industry, and if you’re going to put yourself out there online, people are going to want the 100% you. And if you’re not that 100%, then you’re not going to see your business grow as you want to.

Hannah Kerr:

With that, being on top of it and not getting too overwhelmed. I know we’ve mentioned at the beginning of this podcast, you want to enjoy what you do. You only live once and working on social media, like to me, my job is a seven day job. All week, I’m pretty much working, but I love it. It fires me up, but I totally understand how you need tips and tools to make things easier. And that’s why I love offering those because especially in college, when life is so busy and you’re doing so many things, these tools really helped me.

Hannah Kerr:

So one that I will share is definitely plan out your feed. Do you have to schedule your posts every single day? Absolutely not. You don’t have to do that. However, I have found that if I have a big group of photos and a bunch of writing, putting them in a feed, messing around with that aesthetic and planning the posts for like probably the next few weeks or so has helped me and my stress level decreased.

Scott Fogleman:

Those are all good.

Hannah Kerr:

Yeah. And I personally recommend Planoly. Planoly is an app that you can access on your desktop or your iPhone, and I tell people that through my workshops and there are so many other platforms, I just personally use it. I love it. And this isn’t like an ad or anything. I just use it all the time. And definitely apps that are free are always accessible on your phone. Lightroom for people that want to grow and take that step to making your photos look more professional. And you’ll see a difference in your photographs than if you were just to use like an Instagram preset. I think those two things, just utilizing apps, focusing on photography and organizing your posts as best as possible, especially with that app that I use daily would really help your business.

Allison Lanier:

Yeah. And we’ll get these tools from Hannah, so that way we can add them into the show notes. So that way you have access to them. But I will go ahead and preach. I did download Planoly and I love the setup of it, but I did realize that we are managing multiple accounts. And so for me, I kicked it old school because that’s just what I do. And went ahead and set up fully organized, like Excel spreadsheet with different …

Hannah Kerr:

There you go.

Allison Lanier:

Because I know also too, in higher ed, we have different promotions that we’re running at the same time or we have different things that are on campus. And so whatever works for you in terms of being organized.

Hannah Kerr:

Absolutely.

Allison Lanier:

Definitely, that was one of my biggest takeaways though, is that think about it in advance, it goes to your content strategy as a whole, because if you do that, then you’re not going to really miss a day. You can plan ahead for your photographs, your content. And then you’re not just like scrambling to figure it all out.

Hannah Kerr:

Before I invested in my client portal that I use now for my business, y’all, I did not want to spend money. I did all the free stuff and I rocked the Google Docs. Google Docs have Google Excel sheets, you can share with people, you Google folders. I still share photos to people who request Google Docs. So do whatever’s best for you. I can’t tell you, I spent probably almost two years using platforms that you didn’t have to pay for and I did just fine.

Allison Lanier:

Yeah. And those are available to all of our universities and institutions.

Hannah Kerr:

Yeah. Actually, my senior year, I pretty much lived in Google Docs with a lot of my team members. I remember teachers being like, this is such a blessing because we did not have this awhile ago.

Scott Fogleman:

Oh, it’s so nice.

Hannah Kerr:

Oh, it is absolutely.

Allison Lanier:

So kind of to piggyback off of that in a way, or to kind of go off a whole nother branch, when you were in school, how would you have liked to see your university use students for things such as like photography, creative writing, and even as like social media experts?

Hannah Kerr:

I have to say, I think WKU did a really, really good job. I knew our program that had the on campus magazine and they incorporated social media and a lot of graphic design with graphic design majors. And that interests me. So I really kept in touch with that. And a lot of the Greek organizations incorporated the videos and they used people from the photography and videography programs. So if you’re a university and you’re a director of an organization and you’re looking for ways, like utilize the people there, utilize your graphic designing students, your photography students and let them share the content you want to.

Hannah Kerr:

So I think incorporating your students and videos, 100%. All the students have phones. You could ask them, “Hey, send us a little clip that you took about today.” And you can incorporate all those and right then and there you have probably what, over 25 student perspectives in one video that’s less than a minute. That’s insane to me. I think that would be great because if I was a high school student right now and I was looking for a college, I do this with my restaurants now with any business, I go on Instagram, I look, what are their students like? What’s their campus look like? What are their football games look like? Is the morale really positive?

Hannah Kerr:

So I think really utilizing student videos, like having them … I know a lot of universities have a Instagram account for the university and at football games, people tag them and all that. Really utilizing those videos and creating story highlights to pitch to new students, I think giving that to your recruiting staff would be super helpful.

Allison Lanier:

Yes.

Scott Fogleman:

The inverse of that question, as a recent grad, how do you want to stay connected to your university through social? What are the stories that you’re looking for? What do you want to see as an alumni?

Hannah Kerr:

I think as an alumni, I miss the big things like homecoming. I miss the match day for Greek organizations. I miss that first day of school. So I think if you had an Instagram account for your organization and I would set up Instagram story highlights of those big moments, because I do. I sit and scroll and look back at those, and that is a great way for people to find your big stuff really in a short amount of time.

Hannah Kerr:

Because I feel like a lot happens in a school year and if you’re just posting graphics all the time, announcing something that’s happening the next week, that doesn’t really engage me or interest me. So definitely I think that’s what I love. So I even go on YouTube and watch the old homecoming dances and things like that. So even incorporating possibly a YouTube channel for your videography students to upload videos of campus, I think that would be something I would sit instead of watching Netflix at my house on a Friday. I would.

Scott Fogleman:

That makes sense.

Allison Lanier:

Yeah, and so I do know that one fear that a lot of institutions have is that if they give too much freedom to students that they’re like, oh God, what’s going to happen? What are they going to be uploading? [crosstalk 00:29:22] What are they submitting? So do you have any insights on how institutions could maybe develop trainings or relate to the students that they are giving this empowerment to?

Hannah Kerr:

I definitely think institutions should have workshops just about social media sharing and video content. I went to several just for my Greek organization and I wish that was a class. I remember sitting there during these workshops being like, why are teachers not teaching us how to utilize what we are using every single day that applies to our business? So I think especially just because social media, you can put it out there, you’re going to have to monitor it a little.

Allison Lanier:

Yep.

Hannah Kerr:

So having people, I would probably take a poll, see how many people are interested in using social media and putting their business online. Gather those people, make them your marketing team. Have students send in videos, content to them, allow these students to practice looking at content, editing the content, putting it out there in a professional way.

Hannah Kerr:

I think that would be an amazing end of the year project that benefits both the institution and them, it’s a portfolio builder. I think it’s personal experience. I think social media will always have to be monitored. I even go through and edit my stuff 10,000 times. I’m like a one person team, but if you have groups of people, bring them together and allow them to test it out. I think that would really be beneficial for both ends.

Allison Lanier:

Yeah. And one of the major problems in higher ed is budgets. And guess what? Students are free. They’re basically paying to work for you.

Hannah Kerr:

Absolutely. That’s true.

Scott Fogleman:

Well, and you’re giving them value, right? You mentioned building a portfolio, giving that real life experience. One of the biggest challenges you often face when you’re graduating school is I would love to hire you, but where’s your experience. This is how you build those experiences. Build that portfolio. So beyond just academics, again, it’s finding ways through our marketing teams to add experiences that are really additive.

Hannah Kerr:

Absolutely.

Scott Fogleman:

All right. So we are getting close to being out of time. So Hannah, we did want to turn the conversation back your way. Is there anything else that you would just really love to share with our listeners?

Hannah Kerr:

Something I think I’d just love to end on because I think this overall topic is so good. If you have a passion, do not be afraid to put it online. I think you’re going to see how creative you can be and you’re going to see your personality show through work and it will get noticed. I hear a lot that people are afraid to use social media because it’s scary. I’m not going to lie. It’s scary.

Hannah Kerr:

But like I mentioned earlier, the impact you can have on one person, that adds up and I think it’s worth it and it’s worth the fight. So definitely try something new. I am just such an encourager for being creative online. So just go for it. Go for it. Pitch something new. If you don’t like it, you can archive it on Instagram. Just put yourself out there. I think we are going to be seeing a lot of cool stuff in the future.

Scott Fogleman:

Yeah, absolutely.

Allison Lanier:

Yeah. Especially Hannah, I just signed you up to help me with, be my new mommy promoter.

Hannah Kerr:

Mommy blogs are like the top blogs right now, not going to lie.

Allison Lanier:

Yep. It’s going to happen. Well, thank you so much for joining us today, Hannah. It has been an absolute pleasure.

Hannah Kerr:

Well, thank you for having me. I love what you guys are doing with this podcast. And I hope that our listeners enjoyed our topic today.

Allison Lanier:

Yes.

Scott Fogleman:

We did, and we know that they’ll find value in it too.

Hannah Kerr:

Good.

Allison Lanier:

All right, problem solvers. Be sure to subscribe to our show in Apple Podcast or wherever you get your podcasts. And if you don’t mind giving us a little rating and review, that would be greatly appreciated. Also, be sure to visit us at theundeclaredpodcast.com. We would love for you to leave us your feedback, send us your questions, or even just check in to see what we are all about.

Scott Fogleman:

Absolutely. So until next time, continue the great work out there, solving the problems of higher ed. And remember, if you can make a positive step towards encouragement and engagement from even one student at a time, in a year, that impact is going to be vast.

Outro:

Thank you for listening to this episode of Undeclared, the podcast that guides colleges and universities through their greatest challenges. Please leave us a rating and review and go to theundeclaredpodcast.com to tell us how we can help your college or university succeed. And remember, an educated planet is a better place for everyone.