Transcript 52: Striking the Right Balance in Your Social Media Content, with Andrea Honaker


Intro:

You’re listening to Undeclared, the podcast that provides strategies to overcome the challenges that higher education institutions face. We help colleges and universities attract the right students, because we know an educated planet is a better place for everyone. Please welcome your hosts, Scott Fogleman and Allison Lanier.

Allison Lanier:

Hi, I’m Alison.

Scott Fogleman:

And I’m Scott, and you’re listening to Undeclared, a podcast for higher education problem solvers where we discuss all things higher ed with university and college professionals, as well as industry experts.

Allison Lanier:

I want to go ahead and point out that we are recording this episode in the middle of April when we are all still dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic. The landscape of higher ed and life as a whole has changed overnight and we are so thankful for the work that each and every one of you do. For the social media managers and digital content specialists of the world, a lot of the communication efforts fall on you. Congrats.

Scott Fogleman:

Absolutely, 100%. We know a lot of this is falling on you guys. So we know this time has been challenging, but it has also been incredible just to see how quickly you all have innovated, how you have pivoted to ensure education is continuing in the face of a crisis, and beyond that, it has just been so awesome to see the commitment to clear and constant communication to your students, their families, and your campus communities as a whole. We know that takes a lot of hard work, and so we’re just really proud of all the great work you guys are doing out there. So now more than ever, we can all understand the importance of great content and the need to have a plan to enable our teams to consistently produce content that has purpose. Content that our followers want to engage with is critical to our success. So that’s going to be a key thing we’ll discuss today too. So our guest today is well versed in what it takes to establish and maintain a consistent voice across all channels, how to fully embrace storytelling for your institution, and how to tie those priorities together to generate engagement.

Allison Lanier:

Today, we would like to introduce you to our guest, Andrea Honaker. Andrea holds a bachelor’s degree in journalism from West Virginia University and spent the first dozen years of her career in the newspaper industry where she took on roles as a copy editor/page designer, lifestyles reporter, and education reporter. In 2018, she transitioned to work in higher education by becoming a digital content specialist in the marketing communications department at Mercer University. Her primary duties are managing content for the university’s main social media platforms and writing feature stories for the university’s new site. Andrea, we are so excited to have you on the show today. So I’m going to go ahead and toss it over to you to see if there’s anything else you’d like to add to introduce yourself to our audience.

Andrea Honaker:

Well, thank you so much for having me. I feel honored that you all asked me to be here, and I think you hit on the hot points, but I guess I would just add that I live in Macon, Georgia with my husband Drew, baby girl Clara, who is 10 months old and –

Scott Fogleman:

Congrats.

Andrea Honaker:

– we’ve also got five furry family members too.

Allison Lanier:

So you have a lot keeping you occupied during quarantine.

Andrea Honaker:

Yeah, a little too much, actually.

Scott Fogleman:

I’m sure many people can relate to that. So thanks again for joining us today. We’re so excited to have someone with your background joining us, because it’s always great to see how journalism can then play into the world of higher ed and how you can really bring to life storytelling. So before we dig into all the questions that Allison and I have burning, tell us a little bit about what makes you most passionate about your role, and beyond that, how you came to work in higher ed?

Andrea Honaker:

Well, I think for me, pretty much all of the roles and where I am today really goes back to my love of writing and my love for telling stories about people. I actually started out in journalism. That’s what my degree is in from West Virginia University, and there I got skills in copy editing, page design, recording, editing, that kind of thing, but I was always more interested in reporting. That was kind of what I found to be the most interesting because I can really get in on those writing skills, but my first couple jobs in journalism ended up being on the copy desk. So I was editing stories as well as doing some page design stuff, and I just kind of ended up there because that’s where the jobs were at the time. People were looking for copy editors, but while I was in those jobs, I found that I always missed writing and I was finding ways that I could still keep on doing that. I volunteered to write feature stories on the side just so I could keep my skills fresh and –

Scott Fogleman:

Oh, nice.

Andrea Honaker:

– continue to tell those stories, and then finally, about four years in my job at the [inaudible 00:04:48] Gazette, a lifestyles reporter position opened up, and I think I literally jumped at the chance to get over there. As soon as I found out that the lifestyles reporter was leaving, I was debating to myself, how long do I have to wait before I can run over there and tell the boss that I can get in on that and that I would love to be a part of it? So I ended up getting that job and I was finally writing full time, which had been my goal the whole time, and fast forward a couple of years. I ended up in Macon, Georgia. My husband and I relocated for his job and I started doing some freelance writing for some local publications, and then I ended up as the educational reporter at The Telegraph.

Andrea Honaker:

So that was work that I found was really important and I was covering news from preschool all the way up to college, including writing some about what Mercer was doing, but I did find amid all that, that I still was missing running those feature stories where I could focus on people and the positive things that they were doing in the community to make a difference, and I happened to see that there was a opening for a digital content specialist that Mercer, applied for that, and that’s where I’ve been for the past few years –

Scott Fogleman:

The rest is history?

Andrea Honaker:

It is, but it’s really been a wonderful change for me. It’s been a really nice change of pace. I’d wanted to try something new and I’ve really been loving it. I have a lot of fun working on the social media content and planning all that out, and I’ve been able to tell some really great stories. So it’s been awesome.

Allison Lanier:

That’s awesome.

Scott Fogleman:

That’s great. It’s so cool too when life just kind of brings you opportunities that fill your passion, and that’s kind of how Alison and I both landed at Up & Up. So that’s great to hear and it’s really fortunate for Mercer as well to know that they have someone who’s truly passionate about storytelling in your role. So that’s great.

Allison Lanier:

Yeah.

Andrea Honaker:

Thank you.

Allison Lanier:

Do you mind expanding a little bit more about what exactly you do for Mercer? And then how are you bringing kind of like your background in to make that role successful?

Andrea Honaker:

Sure. So my title is digital content specialist, so I coordinate and manage the social media content for Mercer’s main social media platforms, so Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. We’re reaching out to a wide variety of audiences. We’re looking at perspective students, current students, as well as community members, alumni, parents of students. So we’re really kind of reaching out to a little bit of everybody. So I handle scheduling and gathering all that content, and then another one of my big duties is writing feature stories for our new site. We already had a lot of news stories going on the site. They were just kind of telling about the latest and greatest things coming out of the university, but what we wanted to do was have more stories that were going in depth into these awesome projects that students and faculty and staff members were working on and to be able to highlight those things a little bit more. So I’ve helped to kind of beef up our website in those respects so we have some more in depth stories.

Allison Lanier:

That’s awesome. So in relation to that, it sounds like you’re having to do a lot of kind of coordinating on various pieces and stories. So how are you managing that? Have you developed a content calendar and you’re kind of creating those stories based on what’s going on around the university, kind of in the community, or what are some really cool ways that you’re having to, I guess, keep everything organized?

Andrea Honaker:

Well yeah, a big part of my job is managing a content calendar for all of our social media platforms. We use a system called Click Up to make that all happen, but I guess what we’ve kind of found is that the goal with social media is to look kind of effortless, but I think the secret is that it actually takes a whole lot of effort and planning behind the scenes to actually do that. So without that coordination and all this planning, it can seem a little too hectic or you might sacrifice quality on your posts and that kind of thing. So the calendar I think is really important. So I schedule out all of our posts and tag what platforms are going to appear on and write out the text, and then I work with whoever I need to for the visuals that are going to go with it. So our videographer, our photographers, our graphic designers, whatever we might need to visually represent that post, and then at the beginning of the week I discuss all the calendar items with my team and we make tweaks to the run dates and adjust everything accordingly, and then before anything is posted, all that gets reviewed and approved so that we can make sure every post is representing the university well and we don’t have any mistakes or that kind of thing.

Andrea Honaker:

So that’s our way of just fine tuning everything and making sure it’s pretty much the best that it can be, but another thing that I help with is just the brainstorming for all the posts. We have come up with several, what we call content buckets, where we’re trying to do a certain number of posts in these categories each month, and that ensures that we have a number of posts that are meeting each of these categories, and then we’re also … they kind of align with the university’s mission and goals and that kind of thing. So we try to have posts that are just fun, we have nostalgic posts, a lot of campus photos. Then we have posts that try to hit on meaningful outcomes, community, discovery and innovation. That’s a lot of research projects and things, and then service, because one of Mercer’s main missions is service to the community and to the world and that kind of thing. So I help with the brainstorming of that kind of thing.

Allison Lanier:

That’s awesome. I love that you have a direct plan that it’s all coordinating too, so it’s not like, “Hey, what do we have to come up with this week?” You actually are aligning everything with your mission and values of the university, which is huge.

Andrea Honaker:

Yeah. I think that really helps a lot too. That way you don’t feel so much like you’re flying by the seat of your pants all the time trying to get posts done, and of course we add in things that come up. There might be trends that come up, social media trends or current events, that kind of thing. So we definitely switch things up a lot, but it helps to have things on the calendar and just kind of go from there.

Scott Fogleman:

Absolutely. So when you all are identifying those content buckets, as you mentioned, are you looking at your university’s strategic plan? Are you doing any research? How are you coming up with those buckets? And then how are you making sure that they’re tying also to those feature stories that you spoke about?

Andrea Honaker:

So a lot of them do tie our strategic plan for the university. I think it was last year we just came out with our most recent 10 year strategic plan. So the meaningful outcomes, community discovery and innovation and service, those are definitely ones that tie over to our strategic plan. So after that first came out, we definitely brainstormed a huge list to see so we could have ideas going to the feature and we’ve been working through those as we go along through the year.

Scott Fogleman:

Okay.

Andrea Honaker:

But then also when it comes to those content buckets, fun and nostalgia, that was something at first when we put them in there, we thought, “Oh, maybe a couple posts a month,” but once we started thinking about it more, we’re like, “That’s kind of what people really want to see you the most.” Of course they want to know about meaningful outcomes, community discovery, and innovation of services are really important, but you don’t want it to be too heavy all the time. Sometimes people just want to see pretty pictures of campus or they want to –

Allison Lanier:

Or puppies, mascots.

Andrea Honaker:

Or if they’re an alumni, they want to be reminded of when they were at Mercer. So we just wanted to make sure we didn’t forget about those things that people really want to see. So we kind of increased the number of fun and nostalgic posts, just because we realized that is what people would definitely always want to see and they would miss it if it wasn’t there.

Scott Fogleman:

Absolutely. So how are you guys using kind of measurement? Are you looking for engagement? Are you looking for just number of views? What are you guys really looking to achieve with your posts?

Andrea Honaker:

We look most at engagements, and we do check out metrics on that all the time. So we kind of evaluate those week by week and see how well things performed. We also like to look at the video views, how many shares a posts may have had, as well as comments and that kind of thing. So we definitely adjust the upcoming posts after we’ve looked at those kinds of analytics.

Scott Fogleman:

Sure.

Andrea Honaker:

If something didn’t perform well, we would change things up for a similar post coming up and we rethink the way that we’re going to do them so that it would hopefully perform a little better the next time, and it also helps us determine which platform we want our posts to get put on. We started an Instagram feature called Dogs of Mercer a couple of years ago, and it is just really cute dogs on Mercer’s campus, and we tag the people whose dogs it is and write little cute captions for it, and those have done really, really well on our Instagram page, but at first we started out putting that on Facebook and Twitter and people were kind of like, “What is this?” It almost seemed a little bit too random for Facebook and Twitter and that was something that we learned from, and since then we’ve just put them on Instagram and they’ve continued to do amazing, but that’s just one way that we figured out how to adapt things.

Allison Lanier:

I was going to say, that’s definitely a great example of understanding your target audience and where they live, because I mean I think we all have to do that as we’re managing our social media accounts. We’re like, “Okay, who is looking at this? Who’s going to find it important?” I mean, there’s definitely very different users on each platform. So that’s good that you guys were able to view that and make those quick adjustments for sure.

Scott Fogleman:

Yeah.

Andrea Honaker:

And I was going to add that we also do look at our analytics from year to year too, and we compare our numbers maybe from May last year to May this year or previous years to see how things have changed, especially around landmark events, like graduation or move in day, that kind of thing. Obviously this year graduation is going to be a little different, but we kind of compare the landmark university events and we have been encouraged to see an upward tick as we move along. So it’s just really nice to see all the efforts come together and see followers and fans increasing and engagements increasing over time like that.

Scott Fogleman:

Oh, that’s great. So a question for kind of just the point in time that we’re in right now, how has your team had to kind of pivot your plans to kind of pull in some of the crisis communication, campus communication, like, “Hey, we’re moving online. This is the impact to students and our community.” How have you all been able to kind of work that into your plan that was already presented prior to any of the COVID-19 debacle we’re all in? I’m just going to say a debacle because that’s the best word I can come up with.

Andrea Honaker:

Yeah, yeah, absolutely. Well, we started out … and we’re still doing this now. We have been putting all the updates about campus operations on a new page on our website. I think it’s mostly about EDU/coronavirus. So that’s how we’ve been keeping the community and our students and parents informed, and then they send out regular emails with that information as well, but the marketing communications team, they created a new student center resort site called the Den. It’s den.mercer.edu. This is actually something that my boss and the team had been wanting to create long before I even got to Mercer, but it really makes sense to roll it out during the current situation, because they were finding it was important to have a place where they could post extra resources to help students during this challenging time.

Allison Lanier:

Yeah.

Andrea Honaker:

So they post on there things like bear hug videos with words of encouragement from students and staff. They’ve got stories about best practices on distance learning and just keys for being a good online communicator, and also just stories about Mercerians are helping during the pandemic or serving on frontlines. So this has really been a place where we can pull all those resources together and where students, as well as the community, can go to just find those extra resources that they might need for navigating this time, and whenever the coronavirus is a distant memory, hopefully not too far into the future here, hopefully that will be behind us, but then it’s still going to be a place that’s there for students and the community to go for content just relating to being a Mercerian and just for all things Mercer.

Scott Fogleman:

Yeah, that’s great, and I mean even without the current environment, what a great resource. I mean that just seems like something that would be wonderful to have anyways. I want a den.

Andrea Honaker:

And another thing I was going to mention too, if I can –

Allison Lanier:

Yeah.

Andrea Honaker:

– mention something along that topic, as far as social media amid all this time, especially when everything first started happening, I feel like it was just a tricky time for social media posts in general.

Scott Fogleman:

Sure.

Andrea Honaker:

It was like we didn’t want all the posts to be super serious and related to COVID, but you also didn’t want to overlook it, and you didn’t want to post anything that seemed too fun or insensitive or things that would get lost in the shuffle. So it’s definitely been a bit of a balancing act trying to figure out how best do the social media posts, but I feel like we have figured out how to make that work and we’re just trying to do a mix of posts that are informing the community about what’s going on, but also it’s things that just remind them about why Mercer is a great place and remind them about student achievements and those kinds of things amid all that.

Scott Fogleman:

Yeah.

Allison Lanier:

Yeah. You got to still keep that kind of piece of normality. So yeah, it’s kind of tricky, because that is what you saw, not just in higher ed, but everywhere. It was initially boom, everyone’s having their communications around COVID. We all got the emails from CEOs of companies and all of this stuff. It was one thing after another, but then I think once we all kind of settled in and were like, “Oh, this is legitimately our new normal,” then you kind of have to have a little bit more fun with it, and like you said, it’s that balance of okay, don’t be insensitive, but you also have to kind of keep the ball rolling, and I think it’s great that you guys were able to capitalize on getting something done that you’ve been wanting to do for a long time, but I think that that also shows just everyone’s ability to be able to pivot so quickly, and hopefully it’s a really good message for board members and presidents and all of those that are kind of stuck in the mud a little bit of, “Hey, if you just let us go, we can do these things and we can adapt,” and I mean this has definitely forced everyone to adapt as fast as possible and you guys are doing that, which is great.

Andrea Honaker:

We’re definitely trying to in every way we can.

Allison Lanier:

Yeah.

Scott Fogleman:

So tell us a little bit about … I mean clearly you have a very robust content calendar, and we know it takes a lot of human power behind that to execute. What’s your team structured like and how do you guys really kind of work cohesively to make sure that everybody knows their role and knows what they’re responsible for to keep the machine moving?

Andrea Honaker:

So in the marketing communications department, like I mentioned before, we’re dealing with communications for the overall university, but within the department, we probably have about a dozen staff members, and that includes a video coordinator, we have a media relations director, a website developer, and there’s also a photography coordinator and some graphic designers. So everybody … we’re all constantly just working together and coordinating on projects and we’ve got a great team. Everybody is amazing, and so talented. Now other schools and departments within Mercer, they have their own marketing and social media staff, and we do collaborate with them on projects just to ensure we’re getting our message out to the proper audiences, whereas we’re speaking for the university as a whole and to such a wide audience, they’re targeting more specific people, such as prospective students for the admissions department, that kind of thing. So yeah, but just within our staff, we collaborate often and we figure out who’s going to do what during weekly meetings, especially for social media. That’s when we all get together, figure out what’s on the calendar coming up for the next couple of weeks to months, and then figure out what videos need tackled and what kind of photos we might need coming up, and we have some amazing photographers on staff as well as graphic designers. So we’re just all constantly getting together to see what needs to be done.

Scott Fogleman:

That’s good. So it kind of sounds like too, you really can’t look too far in advance, but you’re kind of looking at your meeting weekly, you’re looking out maybe a month to assign those. So do you ever have any challenges with that or has that been the way that you’re able to really respond to what you know that is being demanded, kind of from the market and being able to nimble?

Andrea Honaker:

It definitely is interesting and takes a bit of balancing, yeah, but we definitely try to have things pretty well laid out on our social media calendar for at least like two weeks normally we have it filled up, but then for going into the month ahead, we generally do have things on the calendar that we want to pursue, and then as we go along, have other meetings, it’s really easy to fill in the rest of the calendar with things that are coming up, events, happenings, just things that we’ve heard about also through word of mouth.

Scott Fogleman:

Yeah.

Andrea Honaker:

So we definitely try to be flexible and we are thinking into the future, especially when it comes to our big events. We know about them coming up far in advance and try to put together plans, but you also sometimes can’t think about it too early.

Allison Lanier:

Yeah.

Scott Fogleman:

Yeah, okay. Yeah, so that two week window kind of sounds like it’s the critical point.

Andrea Honaker:

Yeah, and then you have [inaudible 00:24:16] as necessary.

Allison Lanier:

Very true. So I know that you spoke earlier about you guys plan a lot around your strategic plan and your mission and values, but where are you al pulling maybe some outside inspiration from? Are you looking at what’s going on in the business world to pull it in? Or where are you getting your different ideas from?

Andrea Honaker:

A lot of our ideas are … you were talking about this a second ago. We do get a lot of ideas whenever we’re doing that brainstorming for our content buckets. So a lot of it just comes out of our weekly meetings for that, but we have a lot of things that just come to us word of mouth, faculty, staff, students that let us know about all the cool things that are going on and we get a lot of inspiration from that, but I also find a lot of ideas going through our old Mercer yearbooks.

Scott Fogleman:

Oh, yeah.

Andrea Honaker:

I look through library archives sometimes for the sport photos, and then I’m constantly checking the Mercer event calendar as well as just national calendars for things coming up, and one big resource that I’ve started using recently is a group on Facebook called Higher Ed Social.

Allison Lanier:

Oh, cool.

Andrea Honaker:

And it is just a … it’s all people in jobs like I’m in right now who are helping manage social media for universities and colleges across the country, and even different countries as well. So there’s a lot of discussion on there about current trends, things that are going on. If people have questions about how to tackle something or if they just did something really awesome, they’ll share that on there and that provides inspiration to other people working in the field too. So that’s been a great resource for inspiration for upcoming posts.

Allison Lanier:

That’s awesome. We haven’t heard of that one yet, so we’ll definitely make sure that we share that. So anyone that’s listening, if they want to join that group, it sounds like it would be very helpful.

Andrea Honaker:

Yeah. It’s been invaluable to be able to bounce those ideas off of other professionals in that situation.

Allison Lanier:

Yeah, because you can’t necessarily travel all the time to go to conferences and all that fun stuff and you can’t travel at all right now. So it’s good to have –

Scott Fogleman:

It’s good to have someone you can speak to also who is like, “Is this a good idea? What are you doing?”

Andrea Honaker:

Yeah, some things just come up or I’ll see a trend and I’m like, “What is this? I don’t really understand this. Has anybody done this? Is this a thing?” And it’s just nice to get verification from other people if it’s a thing.

Allison Lanier:

Yeah. So you mentioned that you guys are getting some inspiration from students and things of that nature. Are you utilizing students at all in your posts, handing it over to them and allowing them to own your social media accounts for a day or anything like that?

Andrea Honaker:

We mostly just do that through our Instagram stories, especially whenever we have special events coming up, say an admissions event or move in day, graduation, those kinds of things. We do get our students involved so that they can take over the Instagram story and just post things as they go along. So that’s the main way that we get students involved, but we also have some great student interns who work with us every semester. So they often help with written stories as well as Instagram stories, and we have them get in our pictures and videos and that kind of thing too.

Allison Lanier:

Awesome.

Andrea Honaker:

And also for the Den site right now, we have students who have been doing some of our daily bear hug videos, offering words of encouragement. So we definitely want people to see students kind of front and center and not always be seeing just faculty and staff.

Allison Lanier:

Yeah.

Scott Fogleman:

That’s a big thing. So another big thing with social and any content we put out is just around consistency and brand consistency. So what are you using to make sure that no matter who’s posting, there is some level of consistency, whether it be the voice and the tone, the style, do you have a guideline document? Do you do training? How do you kind of keep a pulse check on that?

Andrea Honaker:

Well, I think that a lot of that has just come about organically, really. So I think that through always having our posts reviewed by other people on the team and just getting approval before things run, it ensures that we’re all on the same page as far as the way that we’re communicating and getting that news out there, and we do have some style guides that have been established that help with that as well, but I think a lot of that has just kind of been learned as we go along about how to present that voice.

Allison Lanier:

So just out of curiosity, because right now obviously getting on campus and getting really good imagery and all that good stuff is a little stagnant, so how are you guys getting some of that creative content to be able to still be current and relevant? Or are you having to utilize maybe imagery that already existed?

Andrea Honaker:

We’re doing a little bit of both. We do have a great photo archive where we can turn to to get photos of campus throughout all the seasons, but we have people that are submitting us new things.

Allison Lanier:

Oh, cool.

Andrea Honaker:

We have been relying a little bit more on submitted content lately, just given the current circumstances. So the bear hug videos I mentioned, that’s submitted content. We’ve asked people to submit their photos of what kind of online or what kind of homework spaces they’ve created to do their work from home.

Allison Lanier:

Oh, cool.

Andrea Honaker:

So we are asking for a little bit of more submitted content, but we have some of our great photographers on staff and our videographer. They’re still able to go out and shoot some things while practicing social distancing. Since no one else has been on campus, that’s pretty easy for them to still do, so when they have time, they’re still out there and able to get some of that stuff as well.

Allison Lanier:

Awesome. Cool. Well I know that we have covered a lot and I just realized that time flew by. So is there anything that we didn’t have a chance to touch on that you wanted to go ahead and mention?

Andrea Honaker:

I think we have covered almost everything. I guess I would add that I just feel privileged to be working for Mercer and I’m constantly inspired by the things that I see our students and faculty and staff doing. Whenever I came to Macon, I think it was about six years ago now, I thought the campus here in Macon was so beautiful and I always hoped that I would have the chance to work here because it just seemed such amazing things were always happening, but it’s definitely an honor to be able to tell some of these stories that are coming out of the university and let people know how many great things our Mercerians are doing and how a lot of these things are really impacting our community and making a difference in the world. So I consider it a big honor and privilege.

Allison Lanier:

That’s awesome.

Scott Fogleman:

That’s got to be fun too, your just being able to highlight and kind of almost be a cheerleader of all the great things going on.

Allison Lanier:

Yep.

Andrea Honaker:

Yeah, yeah. It really has been. Generally I find myself to be a positive person. I kind of thrive on positivity and to be able to just share that kind of thing and be a positive voice. I love that so much.

Scott Fogleman:

That’s great.

Andrea Honaker:

And I’m constantly learning in everything I do. Going back to journalism and what I’m doing now, I think one of the best things about doing interviews and writing stories is that I’m constantly learning new things myself and I get to talk to the experts about it so that they can tell me exactly how all these things work.

Scott Fogleman:

Hey, that’s why we love Undeclared too.

Andrea Honaker:

Yeah. It definitely has expanded my horizons a lot as well.

Scott Fogleman:

That’s awesome. So before we let you go, we do have one final question for you. So if you could go back in time and give yourself one pro tip, whether that be personal or professional, what would it be and why?

Andrea Honaker:

So I think professionally, I would probably remind my past self to not dwell on things that don’t print out like I’d hoped, and one thing kind of started saying to myself as a reporter referring to my stories is that they can’t all be award winners. It might sound like a slightly lazy sentiment, but in reality it was just kind of my way to remind myself that you’ve done your very best work, you’ve tried to make this great and perfect, but sometimes that’s impossible and sometimes things don’t turn out the way you hoped they would. So I would just remind my past self to always give my projects my best shot and to be proud of that work and that effort always, but to when necessary move on, learn from that experience, and before long your next award winning project will come along.

Allison Lanier:

I love it.

Scott Fogleman:

That’s great advice.

Allison Lanier:

I know. I always feel like I always get in my head so I can totally relate to that, where you just are constantly beating yourself up, but then it’s taking you away from how do you improve for the next time? How do you just take this as a lesson? How do you just move forward?

Andrea Honaker:

Absolutely.

Allison Lanier:

I love it. Well, Andrea, thank you so much for joining us today. It’s been an absolute pleasure talking to you.

Andrea Honaker:

Thank you all so much for having me. I really appreciate you all spending some time with me and wanting to learn about what I do.

Scott Fogleman:

Yeah, thanks for jumping on.

Allison Lanier:

All right problem solvers, be sure to subscribe to our show in Apple Podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts, and if you don’t mind, give us a little rating and review. That would be greatly appreciated, and be sure to visit us at theundeclaredpodcast.com. We would love for you to leave us your feedback, send us your questions, or even just check in to see what we’re all about.

Scott Fogleman:

Absolutely. So until next time, continue the great work out there solving the problems of higher ed and remember, always give it your best and be proud of the work that you can do. Be consistent, be organized, and share those stories.

Outro:

Thank you for listening to this episode of Undeclared, the podcast that guides colleges and universities in their greatest challenges. Please leave us a rating and review and go to theundeclaredpodcast.com to tell us how we can help your college or university succeed, and remember, an educated planet is a better place for everyone.